Pacific Northwest Christian College Academics
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ACADEMICS

Pacific Northwest Christian College is committed to academic excellence throughout the scope and sequence of the program. Students are expected to “rise to the occasion” in all academic endeavors, and our professors are there to help. This means completing reading and homework assignments on time, understanding the coursework, asking questions, exploring through independent research, gaining competence in the mathematics, sciences, and writing at the college level. Learning is maximized when these are accomplished. Our goal is a seamless transition for our students to other institutions of higher learning, both public and private.

PNWCC graduates are educated to think about life’s most important issues with clarity, wisdom, and a deep understanding of the foundational commitments of the historic Christian faith. They are agents of PNWCC who live faithfully into their vocations.

2021 Book List can found here.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS

CO 102 Fundamentals of Speech (3)

Emphasizes the content, organization, and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Students receive the instructor’s input on each step in the process of writing and delivering four-types of speeches. Biblical ethos is emphasized.

EN 123, 132 College Writing I, II (3, 3)

College writing is a year-long required course designed to prepare students to think and write clearly, and to perform undergraduate-level research. EN123 is a prerequisite for EN132 and must be taken in sequence.

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

MA 095 Math Basics

MA 096 Pre-Introductory Algebra

MA 097 Introductory Algebra

MA 098 Intermediate Algebra (0)

Placement for these remedial courses will be based on entrance testing. Review of basic arithmetic and elementary algebra will be covered to prepare the student for collegiate-level math courses. No credit is earned toward degree. Remedial courses may have an additional fee. Prerequisite: placement via entrance test score; advancement through this series requires a minimum GPA of 2.0.

MA 107 Math in Society (3)

This course will introduce students to the applications of mathematics in a variety of disciplines with the goal of helping them to see mathematics as the useful tool rather than just as a requirement for obtaining a college diploma. It will also investigate the spiritual dimensions of mathematics as the underlying code of creation. Topics include history of mathematics, numeration and numerical
systems, number theory, chaos, fractals and finances. Prerequisite: MA 098 or placement via entrance test score.

MA 113 College Algebra (3)

A college algebra course with emphasis on connections between math concepts and the real world. Functions are the core of this course and are presented as a thread that runs throughout the course rather than as an isolated topic. Topics include properties of the real numbers; functions-linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic; systems of equations and matrices; inequalities; conic sections; sequences. Prerequisite: MA 098 or placement via entrance test score.

MA 141 Precalculus I (3)

Precalculus I is the first semester of the pre-calculus sequence designed to prepare students for entry into the calculus sequence. The topics include: absolute value, complex numbers, linear and quadratic equations, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse functions, theory of equations, and sequences and series. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or better in MA 098 or satisfactory placement test score.

MA 142 Precalculus II (3)

Precalculus II is the second semester of the precalculus sequence, designed to prepare students for entry into the calculus sequence. Precalculus II focuses predominantly on trigonometry. The topics include trigonometric functions and their inverses, solving triangles, circular functions, identities, conditional equations, complex numbers in polar form, conic sections, parametric and polar equations, systems of equations, matrices and determinants, and vectors. Prerequisite: Grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 141 or satisfactory placement test.

MA 146 Introduction to Statistics (3)

This is an introductory course in statistics intended for students in a wide variety of areas of study. Topics discussed include displaying and describing data, the normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests with applications in the real world. Students also have the opportunity to analyze data sets using technology. Prerequisite: MA 098 or
placement via entrance test score.

MA 151 Calculus I (3)

The first course in the sequence for students whose major field of study requires a full year of calculus. Topics include: limits of algebraic and trigonometric expressions and exponential and logarithm functions; the derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric functions, and their inverses; exponential and logarithm functions; hyperbolic functions and their inverses; applications of the derivative, and an introduction to antiderivatives and the definite and indefinite integral. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 142 or satisfactory placement test.

MA 152 Calculus II (3)

A continuation of MA 151. Topics include the fundamental theorem of calculus; techniques of integration; trigonometric integrals and substitution; applications of the definite integral including areas, average values, and volumes: improper integrals; and parametric equations, polar coordinates, arc length, and surface area with polar functions. Prerequisite : grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 151 or
satisfactory placement test.

HUMAN PERFORMANCE

HP 121FC Fitness and Conditioning (1)

A variety of fitness-orientated activities taught for student’s physiological, educational, social, and
recreational values. Daily physical activity is performed and exercise physiology concepts are taught.
This fulfills the fitness-oriented activity credit for graduation. Course may be repeated for credit;
cumulative maximum hours 2. An additional fee may be charged.

HP 131 TS Team Sports (1)

A variety of skill-orientated activities taught for physiological, educational, social, and recreational value. Daily physical activity is required which will include skill development and game situations. The conceptual understanding of the game will include rules, strategies, terminology, and history. Course may be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum hours 2. An additional fee may be charged.

HP 131FB Varsity Sports Men’s Football (1)

This course is restricted to varsity football athletes who compete in men’s football. Student athletes practice daily during the season and compete weekly. This course offers athletic and character development for student athletes interested in competing at the junior college level and beyond.

HP 131S Varsity Sports Soccer (1)

This course is restricted to varsity soccer athletes. Student athletes practice daily during the season and compete weekly. This course offers athletic and character development for student athletes interested in competing at the junior college level and beyond.

HUMANITIES

GH 203 Understanding Church History (3)

The course traces the course of Christianity from its beginnings to the present day. Topics include the early controversies and the development of various creeds, the growth of the Roman Catholic Church, early missionary efforts, the development of church hierarchies. Church splits, The Great Reformation and Counter Reformation, the interactions between Christianity and the Islamic world, and the development of various Protestant theological divisions. In addition, the course will examine the decline of Christianity in the West, coupled with the rapid growth of evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity in the Southern and Eastern Hemispheres, particularly China and southern Africa.

ID 114, 124 American Thought and Culture I, II (3, 3)

An introductory study of significant developments in American history, literature, religion, philosophy, art, and music. Special attention is given to important people and movements that both shaped and were shaped by intellectual and cultural forces in America’s past. The first semester will cover events up to the Civil War era (1875); the second semester from the post-Civil War era to the present.

ID 214, 224 World Thought and Culture I, II (3, 3)

This comprehensive year-long course provides a framework for understanding Western civilization, its intellectual and cultural lineage, weaknesses as well as strengths. Its roots are broader than often supposed including ancient Hebrew and Mesopotamian civilizations. The first semester will cover people, events, religion, art, philosophy, and literature from Ancient Mesopotamia, with a strong emphasis on Ancient Greece as the beginning of the Western heritage, to the Enlightenment era. Second semester will cover developments from the Enlightenment to the present.

MU 202 Introduction to the Worship Arts (3)

This is a study of biblical, historical, and cultural aspects of worship, enabling students to develop a broader understanding of the meaningful worship experience and how that is expressed culturally and between generations. The psychology of worship, healing, and praise are explored as an interwoven story of the supernatural interacting with the natural world expressed through music, art, dance, and the five senses. Different church worship traditions and philosophies and how they have developed historically are explored and brought into contemporary models.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

EC 213 Macro Economics (3)

This course provides an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed. Important policy debates such as, the sub-prime crisis, social security, the public debt, and international economic issues are critically explored. The course introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the U.S. and foreign economies.

EC 214 Micro Economics (3)

This course introduces and explores a variety of everyday, practical microeconomic topics including supply and demand, market equilibrium, elasticity, decision making by producers and consumers, production cost, market structures, public policy, the labor market, distribution of income, environmental policy, market efficiency, and government intervention.

GH 203 Understanding Church History (3)

The course traces the course of Christianity from its beginnings to the present day. Topics include the early controversies and the development of various creeds, the growth of the Roman Catholic Church, early missionary efforts, the development of church hierarchies. Church splits, The Great Reformation and Counter Reformation, the interactions between Christianity and the Islamic world, and the development of various Protestant theological divisions. In addition, the course will examine the decline of Christianity in the West, coupled with the rapid growth of evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity in the Southern and Eastern Hemispheres, particularly China and southern Africa.

IS 202 Global Perspectives (3)

A survey of the biblical basis for missions. Special emphasis is given to cultural barriers in the communication process. Lessons are taken from the history of missions to develop contemporary strategies of present-day missions.

PS 203 General Psychology (3)

This course presents a broad survey of basic concepts, issues, theories, classic experiments and new discoveries in the field of psychology, which is the science concerned with behavior and mental processes. Psychology studies the environmental, biological, social, and individual forces that help to describe, explain, predict, and control behavior. This course examines the history of psychology, the brain, the senses, human development, language, thinking (including critical thinking), learning, motivation, emotion, social psychology, personality, and human diversity, including psychological problems such as anxiety, schizophrenia, paranoia, depression, bipolar disorder, and suicide.

SO 203 General Sociology (3)

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior in groups and the social forces that shape society and to the social construction of reality. Special attention is given to the application of sociological ideas and analysis. Topics include, but are not limited to, methods of research, major sociological theory, culture, socialization, group dynamics and interaction, deviance, and crime; social stratification; race, ethnicity, and gender; the family; social institutions; population and environment; and social change.

NATURAL SCIENCES

ANAT 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab (4)

Human Anatomy and Physiology investigates the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems. Students will engage with each of the major systems of the body, and will learn through reading, video lessons, case studies, collaborative group work, interactive notebook
projects, and labs. One of the goals of this course is to prepare students with the skills necessary to be successful in future science classes in college and medical fields. This class includes a lab and fee. Prerequisite: MA 096 or satisfactory placement test.

MA 107 Math in Society (3)

This course will introduce students to the applications of mathematics in a variety of disciplines with the goal of helping them to see mathematics as the useful tool rather than just as a requirement for obtaining a college diploma. It will also investigate the spiritual dimensions of mathematics as the underlying code of creation. Topics include history of mathematics, numeration and numerical
systems, number theory, chaos, fractals and finances. Prerequisite: MA 098 or placement via entrance test score.

MA 113 College Algebra (3)

A college algebra course with emphasis on connections between math concepts and the real world. Functions are the core of this course and are presented as a thread that runs throughout the course rather than as an isolated topic. Topics include properties of the real numbers; functions-linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic; systems of equations and matrices; inequalities; conic sections; sequences. Prerequisite: MA 098 or placement via entrance test score.

MA 141 Precalculus I (3)

Precalculus I is the first semester of the pre-calculus sequence designed to prepare students for entry into the calculus sequence. The topics include: absolute value, complex numbers, linear and quadratic equations, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse functions, theory of equations, and sequences and series. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or better in MA 098 or satisfactory placement test score.

MA 142 Precalculus II (3)

Precalculus II is the second semester of the precalculus sequence, designed to prepare students for entry into the calculus sequence. Precalculus II focuses predominantly on trigonometry. The topics include trigonometric functions and their inverses, solving triangles, circular functions, identities, conditional equations, complex numbers in polar form, conic sections, parametric and polar equations, systems of equations, matrices and determinants, and vectors. Prerequisite: Grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 141 or satisfactory placement test.

MA 146 Introduction to Statistics (3)

This is an introductory course in statistics intended for students in a wide variety of areas of study. Topics discussed include displaying and describing data, the normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests with applications in the real world. Students also have the opportunity to analyze data sets using technology. Prerequisite: MA 098 or placement via entrance test score.

MA 151 Calculus I (3)

The first course in the sequence for students whose major field of study requires a full year of calculus. Topics include: limits of algebraic and trigonometric expressions and exponential and logarithm functions; the derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric functions, and their inverses; exponential and logarithm functions; hyperbolic functions and their inverses; applications of the derivative, and an introduction to antiderivatives and the definite and indefinite integral. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 142 or satisfactory placement test.

MA 152 Calculus II (3)

A continuation of MA 151. Topics include the fundamental theorem of calculus; techniques of integration; trigonometric integrals and substitution; applications of the definite integral including areas, average values, and volumes: improper integrals; and parametric equations, polar coordinates, arc length, and surface area with polar functions. Prerequisite : grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 151 or satisfactory placement test.

NUTR 110 Nutrition (3)

Principles of nutrition as they apply to macro-nutrients. Economic, cultural, and psychological influences are considered. The need for vitamins, minerals, and special nutritional requirements at different stages of the lifecycle and special topics of current concern are included.

PHYS 110 Basic Physics with Lab (4)

This is an introductory course in physics covering one-dimensional and two-dimensional linear motion and forces, vibrations and wave motion, the behavior of light, and electricity and magnetism. Laboratories emphasize real world applications of the concepts and problem-solving skills taught in this course. Includes a lab and fee. Intended for general education students. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 098 or satisfactory placement test.

SC 114 Biology (3)

This is an introductory course that includes a survey of the kingdom Animalia and a range of topics including origin of life, cell structure and function, the diversity of living forms, their ecology, evolution, and reproduction. Intended for general education students. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 097 or satisfactory placement test.

SC 114L Biology Lab (1)

Students will conduct laboratory investigations utilizing scientific methodology and will participate in several local field trips. Concurrent enrollment in SC 114 is required. A fee may be charged.

SC 120 Environmental Science (3)

This course focuses on the study of the Earth as an interconnected living system. This course provides basic scientific knowledge and understanding of how our world works from an environmental perspective. It will explore the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to both local and global environmental issues. Students will learn to address and interpret major environmental issues in light
of Scripture. Topics covered include but are not limited to human population growth, food resources and production, water resources and management, water pollution, mineral resources, hazardous chemicals, air pollution and climate, energy resources, and sustainability. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 097 or satisfactory placement test.

SC 120L Environmental Science Lab (1)

Students will conduct laboratory investigations utilizing scientific methodology and will participate in several local field trips. Concurrent enrollment in SC120 is required. A fee may be charged.

SC 133 Scientific Inquiry: Physical Sciences (3)

This course introduces the general principles of Physics and Chemistry. Emphasis is put on understanding those principles in relation to how our world works. An overview of the history of science examines the current state of separation of science and religion. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 097 or satisfactory placement test.

SC 133L Scientific Inquiry: Physical Sciences Lab (1)

Students will complete 12 laboratory experiments investigating the physical sciences. The experiments will emphasize the application of the scientific method. Concurrent enrollment in SC133 is required. A fee may be charged.

SC 143 Scientific Inquiry: Life Sciences (3)

Life Sciences students will apply scientific methodology and problem solving in the study of biological concepts. This course examines the origin of life, the classification of life, the characteristics of life, cellular processes, body systems, genetics and the omnipotence of God, the Creator. Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or higher in MA 097 or satisfactory placement test.

SC 143L Scientific Inquiry: Life Sciences Lab (1)

Students will conduct laboratory investigations and activities utilizing scientific methodology. Concurrent enrollment in SC143 is required. A fee may be charged.

BIBLICAL STUDIES

BL 101 The Gospel and the Christian Life (3)

This course is required for every first-year student and is an introduction to the Christian faith. The core beliefs of the Christian faith will be covered including the gospel of Jesus Christ. The meta-narrative of the Bible, key theological concepts, and fundamental Christian practices will also be addressed.

BI 113, 123 Survey of Biblical Literature I, II (3, 3)

This survey is an overview of the Old Testament and New Testament books with an emphasis upon orienting the student to the general content, themes, and style of each book and how they relate to the major people, places, and events of the Testaments. Integration into our contemporary scene and personal application are stressed.

BI 202 Bible Study Methods (3)

An introduction to the principles of the inductive method approach to studying the Bible, the development of techniques, utilization of tools, and the employment of various methods such as synthesis and analysis. The principles of interpreting Scripture are presented.

BI 283 Life of Christ (3)

Life of Christ includes a harmony of the Gospels and a careful study of the incarnate life of Christ as recorded in the Gospels. The course also sets the historic and geographic stage for the advent of Christ and familiarizes students with the political and religious atmosphere in which He lived.

GH 203 Understanding Church History (3)

The course traces the course of Christianity from its beginnings to the present day. Topics include the early controversies and the development of various creeds, the growth of the Roman Catholic Church, early missionary efforts, the development of church hierarchies. Church splits, The Great Reformation and Counter Reformation, the interactions between Christianity and the Islamic world, and the development of various Protestant theological divisions. In addition, the course will examine the decline of Christianity in the West, coupled with the rapid growth of evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity in the Southern and Eastern Hemispheres, particularly China and southern Africa.

IS 202 Global Perspectives (3)

A survey of the biblical basis for missions. Special emphasis is given to cultural barriers in the communication process. Lessons are taken from the history of missions to develop contemporary strategies of present-day missions.

MU 202 Introduction to the Worship Arts (3)

This is a study of biblical, historical and cultural aspects of worship, enabling students to develop a broader understanding of the meaningful worship experience and how that is expressed culturally and between generations. The psychology of worship, healing, and praise are explored as an interwoven story of the supernatural interacting with the natural world expressed through music, art, dance, and the five senses. Different church worship traditions and philosophies and how they have developed historically are explored and brought into contemporary models.

TH 201 Basic Christian Theology (3)

This course provides an overview of the Christian doctrines which gives students an overall system of theology to be covered in one semester. Topics include bibliology, theology proper, Christology, pneumatology, anthropology, hamartiology, soteriology, angelology, ecclesiology, and eschatology.

TH 205, 215 Christian Theology I, II (3, 3)

An in-depth study of Christian doctrine which gives students an overall system of theology to be covered in two semesters and taken consecutively. Topics include bibliology, theology proper, Christology, pneumatology, anthropology, hamartiology, soteriology, angelology, ecclesiology, and
eschatology.

BI 295 Seminar (VARIABLE 1-3)

A group of advanced students studying under a professor with each doing original research and all exchanging results through reports and discussions. Course may be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum hours 3.

GENERAL EDUCATION

SS 101 Student Success (1)

The objective of this course is to give an early introduction to the expectations and challenges of college life and to the academic, social, and procedural system of the higher education system. This course is required for all first year students.

CM 201 Student Practicum (2)

The objective of this practicum is to allow the student to gain real-world experience in a field of their choosing in a local church and/or community organization. Prerequisite: SS 101. The course is offered each semester. Eligible persons using VA Education Benefits may not be able to use CM 201 as part of their degree program.

Math Bridge Intensive Workshop

This workshop is for incoming students who place below College Level in Math based on ALEKS or ACCUPLACER assessment. The course is designed to help students refresh their math skills and transition from high school to college. Students work with an instructor and the web-based ALEKS program to assess and build math skills in preparation for a college math course prior to the start of
the semester.

Typical Full-Time Course Schedule

Semester 1

COURSE CREDIT
Humanities Elective
Writing 1
Math in Society
Social Science Elective
The Gospel and the Christian Life
Student Success

TOTAL
3
3
3
3
3
1

16

Semester 2

COURSE CREDIT
Humanities Elective
Writing 2
Science no lab
Social Science Elective
Biblical Studies Elective

TOTAL
3
3
3
3
3

15

Semester 3

COURSE CREDIT
Humanities Elective
Biblical Studies Elective
Science with Lab
Social Science Elective
Human Performance Elective

TOTAL
3
3
4
3
1

14

Semester 4

COURSE CREDIT
Bible Elective
Speech
Math Elective
Biblical Studies Elective
Human Performance Elective
Practicum

TOTAL
3
3
3
3
1
2

15